NULA NURA: Indigenous Arts Lab

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
NULA NURA: Indigenous Arts Lab on Cockatoo Island 22 – 31 May 2015

Deadline: Midnight, Sunday, 29 March 2015

Successful applicants will be advised in the beginning of April.

The Nula Nura Indigenous Arts Lab is a new project developed in partnership with the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust. The laboratory will provide a development opportunity for emerging and mid-career Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visual artists who are ready to conceive of larger scale and visible outcomes for their practice. Artists will be selected to participate in an intensive 10-day residency.

Nula Nura will be facilitated by renowned Aboriginal artists Djon Mundine OAM and Andrea James. Successful participants will be mentored by leading Aboriginal senior artists through conceptual, design and devising processes for installing and presenting site-specific interdisciplinary art on Cockatoo Island. Nula Nura will be an immersive residency that involves camping on the island for the 10-days.

The Lab will take place from 22 May – 31 May 2015 around historically significant sites at Cockatoo Island, Sydney.

PERFORMANCE SPACE/ SYDNEY HARBOUR HERITAGE IS OFFERING:

A ten-day residency at Cockatoo Island, Sydney Harbour
All meals, plus ‘glamping’ accommodation on Cockatoo Island and per diems
Mentorship sessions and workshops with experienced leading visual artists and curators
A facilitated 1-day showing open to the general public
Technical support for the ten days of the residency

ELIGIBILITY

Be of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent (please provide Aboriginality Certificate if possible)
Currently reside in NSW or be available in Sydney for the residency dates
Emerging or mid-career arts practitioners
Participants are required to be available for the full 10 days of the residency

We encourage applications from artists working across the mediums of visual art, photography, painting, sculpture, textiles, digital media, installation, performance and live art etc.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss your proposal please call 02 8571 9101 or email: nulanura@performancespace.com.au (Sonny Dallas Law, Project Coordinator)

via http://performancespace.com.au/nulanura
visit the website for details on how to apply

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Channels video art festival - calls for submissions

Channels will be hosting a series of exhibitions, screenings, forums and events in September 2015. Submissions are now open to all Australian and international artists who work with video. Selected works will be curated into our festival screening program in Melbourne, Australia and our international satellite events.

Our first artist-led festival in 2013 was a great success showcasing over 120 artists from Australia and around the world. We received over 900 videos from all over the world and after weeks of watching them all and discussing with our selection panel, we created a series of curated screening events across Melbourne including the most popular Video Visions, a 2-hour long screening event at the cinema of Australian Centre for Moving Image (ACMI), and Rooftop Transmissions for NGV Melbourne Now.

via http://channelsfestival.net.au/submissions - visit the site for more details on how to submit your work

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CFP: The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium

The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium
Call for Papers
via http://www.tura.com.au/tura-program/the-2015-totally-huge-new-music-fest...

The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium
Thursday May 21
The State Library of Western Australia, Perth Cultural Centre

Theme: Western Australian Art Music: 1970 – 2014
in association with the launch of the Western Australian New Music Archive

Keynote Speakers:
Stephen Adams, Australian Music Producer, ABC Classic FM.
A/Prof Cat Hope, Project Leader, Western Australian New Music Archive.

The Australian Research Council Linkage funded Western Australian New Music Archive (WANMA) will be launched at the State Library of Western Australia on Wednesday 20th of May 2015 as part of the 12th Totally Huge New Music Festival in Perth, Western Australia.

Papers for an associated one-day symposium the following day are sought, on the theme of “Western Australian Art Music Activity: 1970 – 2014” to celebrate the launch of WANMA, a digital archive focusing on the Western Australian art music since 1970 to the present day.

The call is for papers and panel proposals around remembering Western Australian music, in particular music with links to Western Australian composers, performers, writers, events, music series, writing, artists and other associated organisations or people. Monographs on or interviews with Western Australian composers, ensemble, curators or events are particularly welcome.

Composers that are likely to feature in the early iteration of the archive include Ross Bolleter, Alan Lamb, David Pye, Cathie Travers, Hannah Clemen, Lindsay Vickery, James Ledger, Iain Gradage, Roger Smalley, Chris Tonkin, Rupert Guenther, Nela Trifkovic, Rob Muir, Stephen Benfall, Chris Cobilis and many current WA composers. Ensembles and performers such as Alea, Pi Ensemble, the WASO New Music ensemble, Axis 21, Skadada, Decibel, Magnetic Pig, Energia, Headkikr, KAK, Lux Mammoth, Smidrin, Steve Richter, The High Impedence, Jo Re Mi, Tetrafide, Defying Gravity, Schvendes and student ensembles from UWA and WAAPA past and present. Events such as Club Zho, Totally Huge New Music Festival, Scale Variable, WAAPA and UWA lunchtime concerts, Noisemachin!, Guerilla Sessions and any current activity.

The papers will be double blind peer reviewed and published in Volume 5 of “Soundscripts”.

Abstracts between 300 and 500 words due by Feb 25 2015.
Notification of acceptance 10 March 2015.
Registrations due 15 April 2015 $100 for all.

Abstracts to conference@tura.com.au

Presented by Tura, WAAPA, SLWA and The Musicological Society of Australia

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Common Eclectic - music in Glebe Town Hall

Places + spaces invites you to the launch of their series Common Eclectic, music in Glebe Town Hall.

A musical showcase that flirts with intimate performances of comedy, music and magic, Indie artists, chamber opera, gypsy jazz or a twist on a string ensemble. A musical taster to whet the senses.

The series kicks off with Sydney’s favourite folk club High Tea launching their 2015 season with The Maple Trail and PHIA in a double bill on Saturday 7 February. This special show features the sublime songcraft of Aidan Roberts and the kalimba-toting Phia.

The Maple Trail is the project of multi-instrumentalist Aidan Roberts (Belles Will Ring, Lanie Lane, Tubular Bells For Two). Roberts has gathered a new collection of songs to follow 2012's acclaimed album 'Cable Mount Warning'. His music travels from his roots in traditional English and Scottish folk, skewed Americana and distinct vocal and guitar storyscapes. These are the latest tales of winter and summer, light and dark, love and loss, tigers and Tasmania.

Joining The Maple Trail is Berlin-based PHIA - hailed by the European press as “one of Australia’s most underrated musical exports”. She creates “hypnotic, joyful and definitely danceable” music using nothing but an African Kalimba, her voice and a loop pedal, plus her producer/guitarist Josh.

The performance series runs from February to November — what you’ll see and hear is an eclectic selection of music and musicians. The program is dynamic, much like the artists they are working with. It’s an eclectic bunch, flowing from jazz grooves, epic folk music, a touch of classical to sound art and soundscapes in the beautifully restored Glebe Town Hall

Artists include the Crooked Fiddle Band, Spyglass Gypsies, Stephen Adam, Clocks & Clouds, David Bridie, Fred Smith, Mic Conway & Robbie Lang, Hinterlandt Ensemble, Daniel Weltlinger, Simon Lobelson and more.

High Tea with Aidan Roberts and PHIA (double bill)
Saturday 7 February from 7 pm, performance commences at 8pm

Glebe Town Hall, 160 St Johns Road, Glebe

All tickets $15 - book now - Moshtix

Places + spaces thank the City of Sydney for their support as Principal sponsors of this project
-- via places + spaces email

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female:pressure

female pressure is an international network of female artists in the fields of electronic music: from musicians, composers and DJs to visual artists, cultural workers and researchers. A worldwide resource of female talent that can be searched after criteria like location, profession, style or name. "Why are there so few women active in the electronic music scene?" - each one of us has heard this question a thousand times... Here is the answer: It's not our number, it's about how and if we are recognized!

female:pressure intends to strengthen networking, communication and representation - a standard instrument to obtain information about artists, contact them, and find out about other, maybe less known women working in the fields of electronic music all around the globe.

via http://www.femalepressure.net/fempress.html
visit http://www.femalepressure.net for more details

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HYSTERIA feminist platform and collective

HYSTERIA is a periodical, platform and collective for feminist poetry, testimonies, essays, comments, photography, performances, videos, paintings, opinions, excerpts, objections and all mediums of expression.

They are looking for radical and boundary-breaking feminist works spanning a wide range of topics from collectives, individuals, defiant institutions.
see more at: http://www.hystericalfeminisms.com/submit

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The Archive of Digital Art (ADA)

INVITATION FOR SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE ARCHIVE OF DIGITAL ART
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The Archive of Digital Art invites scholars to make contributions:
www.digitalartarchive.at !

The Archive of Digital Art (ADA) expands its field of contributors. Most recently, not only artists, but also scholars can become members of
the vivid online community of the archive.

Since its foundation in 1999, the Archive of Digital Art (former Database of Virtual Art) has become the most important academic online archive for media art. In cooperation with established media artists and institutions it has been documenting the rapidly evolving world of digital art and its related fields for more than a decade and contains today a selection of thousands of artworks at the intersection of art, science, and technology.

Scholars are now invited to upload their publications, information on conferences, exhibitions and teaching to the archive. Thus, they are represented in the archive and can work collaboratively with artists on the documentation and analysis of digital art. Amongst others, collective keywording of media art works is carried out.

Scholars can also use the new ADA “light box” tool which facilitates the examination and comparison of images for research and
teaching. Interested scholars may apply for an account here:
https://www.digitalartarchive.at/support/account-request.html

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Real Talk: Aboriginal Rappers Talk About Their Music And Country book

via https://sites.google.com/site/realtalkthebook

When industry magazine The Music Network asked Australian hip-hop pioneer Urthboy to write about the state of the country's rap scene, his answer took some by surprise. Instead, the Herd member and Elefant Traks boss wrote this: “I was asked to write about the state of hip-hop in Australia. I’d prefer to shine a light on what may be the future of it: Indigenous Hip-Hop. Indigenous artists carry a profoundly engrossing and intriguing story for international audiences, yet it’s barely understood by many Australians.”

This book aims to be an introduction to some of the Aboriginal hip-hop artists out there. All have stories that demand to be heard, from the better-known players like The Last Kinection, Jimblah and Sky’high, to those who are probably too radical for the establishment to handle - such as Provocalz, whose interview ends with the interviewer and interviewee both being questioned by police.

The book is by no means comprehensive - there are about 50 Aboriginal hip-hop artists pumping out quality tracks at the moment, and it speaks to only half of them. But it aims to be a live document, updated at the start of each year. Hopefully it will become more comprehensive as the years tick by. At any rate, readers are encouraged to seek out the artists and follow them in their own, unedited, words.

Reviews:
"A must-read." - I Am Hip-Hop magazine, UK. "A hell of a read - with rappers holding forth on everything from politics to family, books, poetry, activism, homophobia, police brutality... and just about anything else you can think of." - The Koori Mail. "Incredible read." - Jimblah, on the Impossible Odds interview. "Want to read all about me and my thoughts? This is the one right now!" - Briggs. "Amazing interview with Impossible Odds. Everyone should read that interview." - Ozi Batla. "The most articulate and well-researched article on the band I've ever read." - Fred Leone, Impossible Odds. "Probably the most awesome article on Desert Pea Media I have ever seen." - Toby Finlayson, Desert Pea Media. "Of all the interviews we've done - and we've done a hell of a lot - this was, without a doubt, by far the the best." - Kings Konekted. "Best interview I've done. Props." - Provocalz. "Mat always does a good job with the interviews." - Indij hip-hop show founder Munk.

The author, Mat Ward, is a journalist who lives in Sydney. He is not Indigenous. Read more about why he wrote the book here. For more information contact RealTalkTheBook@gmail.com.

The book is available on Amazon (kindle) and all proceeds go to Koori Radio. Visit the book's website to read sample chapters and for more information

For another article on MonkeyMarc and his work with the Barkly community of beat makers and to listen to some of their music, take a look at Boom Bap in the Barkly – Check Australia’s Freshest Desert Beats

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British Library's Save Our Sounds project aims to save their 6.5 million sound collection

Save our Sounds is the British Library’s programme to preserve the nation’s sound heritage
via http://www.bl.uk/projects/save-our-sounds

The British nation’s sound collections are under threat, both from physical degradation and as the means of playing them disappear from production. Archival consensus internationally is that we have approximately 15 years in which to save our sound collections by digitising them before they become unreadable and are effectively lost.

The British Library is home to the British nation’s sound archive, an extraordinary collection of over 6.5 million recordings of speech, music, wildlife and the environment, from the 1880s to the present day. We need both to ensure that the existing archive is properly preserved, and that there are adequate systems in place for the acquisition of future sound production in the UK.

The Save our Sounds programme has been created to answer this imperative need. It has three major aims:

- to preserve as much as possible of the nation's rare and unique sound recordings, not just those in our collections but also key items from partner collections across the UK
- to establish a national radio archive that will collect, protect and share a substantial part of the UK’s vibrant radio output, working with the radio industry and other partners
- to invest in new technology to enable us to receive music in digital formats, working with music labels and industry partners to ensure their long-term preservation

UK Sound Directory

We are undertaking a national audit to map the condition of sound archives around the country and identify other threatened collections – if you have a sound collection which you think could be at risk, get in touch and let us know.

Support the project

Please get in touch with us if you would like to donate to support this project, or to discuss how you or your organisation can help preserve the nation’s audio heritage.
Sounds

Our Sounds website has over 60,000 sound recordings for all to enjoy, covering the entire range of recorded sounds: music, drama and literature, oral history, wildlife and environmental sounds.
The British Library Sound Archive

There is more information on our Sound Archive and how to use its collections on our Help for Researchers pages.

Follow us on Twitter @soundarchive and use the hashtag #saveoursounds

Keep up with the latest news on Sounds through our Sound and vision blog.
- See more at: http://www.bl.uk/projects/save-our-sounds

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Solace – make flags for India Flint’s residency at The Observatory

prophet of bloom: an invitation: Solace

India Flint invites us all to contribute to her residency at The Observatory, in South Australia.

via http://prophet-of-bloom.blogspot.com.au/2014/09/an-invitation.html

Make a triangular flag or pennon [meaning a personal ensign, derived from the Latin penna meaning a wing or a feather] preferably using a piece of pre-loved cloth. Stitch on it a word or a phrase or a sentence that might act as a wish for peace or an acknowledgement of beauty, imply a sense of stillness or simply something that gives you solace. It can be as brief or as long as you like. A haiku, a snatch of song, a word that takes you where you want to be. Attach ties to the tethering end of your flag.

It is important the flags be made from natural fibre fabrics as they will remain in place following prayer flag tradition, to dispense blessings and good wishes to the four winds…any shreds that part company from the whole must be bio-degradable. Additional decorations such as stone or glass beads, shell or wooden buttons are welcome, but please, no plastic.
Post the flag [preferably packaged in paper* not plastic] to :

‘solace’
c/- The Observatory
PO Box 96
Andamooka 5722
South Australia
Australia

for full details see India’s website: http://prophet-of-bloom.blogspot.com.au/2014/09/an-invitation.html

107 Projects call out for volunteers

107 Projects is looking for budding event managers, curators, creative directors, tech heads, photographers and people interested in social media and design.

107 Projects is a not-for-profit, artist run, multi-disciplinary creative space in the heart of Redfern, Sydney, with a creative program that spans music, theatre, poetry, visual arts, and everything in-between.

They are currently seeking intelligent, energetic and enthusiastic volunteers who want to get involved by assisting with the delivery of creative programs as well as those wanting to get some serious arts admin experience.

If you are keen and have some spare time to share with then, send an email listing your previous related experience (if any), and whether you'd like to be involved with visual art, music, performance, admin or all of the above to volunteer@107projects.org

more details at the 107 Projects website

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Hilltop Hoods Initiative $10000 cash incentive towards releasing your album

The HTH Initiative is a $10,000 cash incentive funded by Hilltop Hoods and APRA AMCOS to help emerging Australian Hip Hop and Soul artists to manufacture, market, and release an album. In past years the initiative was restricted to South Australian residents but since 2009 it has been made available to applicants Australia-wide. In addition to the $10,000 in funding, the winner will receive legal advice courtesy of David Vodika and Media Arts Lawyers which can be used for general legal or specific career advice, plus a Zoo York Clothing prize pack and a Love Police ATM Merch Manufacturing Start-Up Kit (to the value of $500).

via http://www.apraamcos.com.au/hth-2015 - visit the APRA AMCOS site or read more for details

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Help make pouches for orphaned joeys

Wildlife rescuers are in need of pouches for orphaned joeys. They provide warmth and comfort, like being in their mother’s pouch. But they need to be changed regularly. for more details and the pattern, visit http://www.ifaw.org/australia/get-involved/help-make-pouches-orphaned-joeys

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create a screeing program at The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia's Arc cinema

Expressions of Interest
via http://www.nfsa.gov.au/about/employment/expressions-interest-arc

Commercial arrangement to deliver a regular screening program in the NFSA’s Arc cinema

The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) is seeking expressions of interest from qualified parties to enter into a commercial arrangement with the NFSA, to develop and deliver a regular, dynamic screening program – or a range of programs – in the NFSA’s Arc cinema.

We want to hear from individuals or organisations who can demonstrate their ability and track record in developing and presenting screening programs and events – including but not limited to historic and archival films.

The programs must be aligned with the NFSA’s strategic objective to make the national audiovisual collection available to the widest possible cross-section of the Australian public. Content can be sourced from the NFSA collection (subject to the
availability of suitable elements) and, consistent with the NFSA Act (2008), programs can also include content that is not in the collection.

We seek an indication of the scope and range of programs you would consider delivering in the context of a commercial arrangement, and require you to provide the following information:

1. Introduction to the individual or organisation, outlining the nature and scale of current operations.
2. Key people in the organisation, their skills and experience.
3. Provide track record of achievements in the development and delivery of screening programs.
4. Indication of potential target audiences and demographic for screening programs.

The technical specifications of Arc cinema can be found on The Arc experience section of our website.

Any questions can be directed to General Manager, Collections on (02) 6248 2104.

Expressions of interest, including contact details and any supporting information, must be provided in writing – by email to procurement@nfsa.gov.au, or by mail to:

National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
GPO Box 2002, Canberra ACT 2601

The closing date for expressions of interest is 2pm, Thursday 19 February 2015.

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Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts course

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts introduces you to the study of early text technologies, focusing principally on the medieval book, but covering other textual objects, too, such as scrolls and diplomata. The Digging Deeper team of scholars from Stanford and Cambridge reveals how to investigate manuscripts within repository settings and through online resources, what to look out for when confronted with manuscript images, and how to exploit all the information a manuscript offers. You will learn major characteristics of book production, the terms and methods used by manuscript historians to describe the book, and key themes in early book history. Where were manuscripts made and who made them? What kinds of materials were used and what can those materials tell us? What kinds of texts were created and copied during these centuries? How did multilingualism matter in the medieval period? In pursuing these questions, you will study some of the most significant and beautiful books held by the university libraries of Cambridge and Stanford.

Digging Deeper is a six-week course, with each week featuring filmed sequences of experts with manuscripts, reading assignments, a short transcription, and self-testing quizzes. Assignments will help you develop a basic knowledge of how to access manuscripts in person and online, skills in codicology (the study of the medieval book and the physical make-up of manuscripts), palaeography (the describing and analysis of medieval scripts), and transcription (the reading and interpretation of writing in manuscripts). Participants who finish the course will earn a Stanford Statement of Accomplishment.

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts will be followed in Spring with a course focusing on the interpretation and preservation of manuscripts in the digital era.

via https://class.stanford.edu/courses/English/DiggingDeeper1/Winter2015/about

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