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Vectors Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular

Vectors maps the multiple contours of daily life in an unevenly digital era, crystallizing around themes that highlight the social, political, and cultural stakes of our increasingly technologically-mediated existence. As such, the journal will speak both implicitly and explicitly to key debates across varied disciplines, including issues of globalization, mobility, power, and access. Operating at the intersection of culture, creativity, and technology, the journal focuses on the myriad ways technology shapes, transforms, reconfigures, and/or impedes social relations, both in the past and in the present. This investigation at the intersection of technology and culture is not simply thematic. Rather, Vectors is realized in multimedia, melding form and content to enact a second-order examination of the mediation of everyday life. Utilizing a peer-reviewed format and under the guidance of an international board, Vectors will feature submissions and specially-commissioned works comprised of moving- and still-images; voice, music, and sound; computational and interactive structures; social software; and much more. Vectors doesn't seek to replace text; instead, we encourage a fusion of old and new media in order to foster ways of knowing and seeing that expand the rigid text-based paradigms of traditional scholarship. In so doing, we aim to explore the immersive and experiential dimensions of emerging scholarly vernaculars. Visit the Vectors Journal website @ http://www.vectorsjournal.org

Nam June Paik

[quote]
..a work from 1973 called A New Design for TV Chair. In it, Paik appropriated an image from a 1940s popular-science magazine that depicts the home viewer of the future watching television. Television had already become a monopolistic industry that was a conduit for advertising, a "communication" industry that operated on a one-way street of information. But in A New Design for TV Chair, Paik posited his own questions to project an alternative future for television:

DO YOU KNOW...?

How soonTV-chair will be available in most museums? How soon artists will have their ownTV channels? How soon wall-to-wallTV for video art will be installed in most homes?

Paik envisioned a different television, a "global groove" of artists' expressions seen as part of an "electronic superhighway" that would be open and free to everyone.The multiple forms of video that Paik developed can be interpreted as an expression of an open medium able to flourish and grow through the imagination and participation of communities and individuals from around the world. Paik, along with many artists working as individuals and within collectives through the 1960s 14 and 1970s to create work for television as well as for alternative spaces, challenged the idea of television as a medium and domain exclusively controlled by a monopoly of broadcasters.

[/quote]

This piece, taken from Nam June Paik's website was written by John Hanhardt of the Guggenheim Museum. I think it's an apt description and I wonder if Nam June Paik would have been happy to see the recent videoblogging community and works becoming more popular on the internet.

Nam June Paik's studio http://www.paikstudios.com/index.html announced over the weekend:

"Nam June Paik passed away at his Miami home at 8:00pm EST on Sunday, January 29th, 2006. Funeral information to be announced."

CEAIT Festival 2006 @ REDCAT, Los Angeles

The genre-bending annual fest from CEAIT, CalArts' Center for Experiments in Art, Information and Technology returns to REDCAT with an international lineup of unabashedly experimental works in music, multimedia, and sound art. read more or visit http://redcat.org/season/0506/mus/ceait.php for details

Arte-Polis: Creative Culture and the Making of Place - Indonesia

In an era of globalization, activities of the creative economy such as fashion, film, television, theater, music, dance, visual arts, design, architecture, advertising, publishing, multimedia and information technology, have contributed significantly to local economy, community life and the creation of places in cities. Such cities have taken advantage of the trend in natural agglomeration of creative industries, not only as a result of economic efficiency but of innovative synergies unleashed in industrial clusters, given that information, imagination, opinions and cultural sensibilities are transmitted through them. This agglomeration of design and knowledge-intensive industries attain place-specific competitive advantages by utilizing local symbolic culture, which becomes embedded in products that are value-added and unique in character. Together with this trend, carefully designed places in cities that offer life-style choices and amenities emerge as an important strategy for attracting talented people. These cultural places become hubs for creative communities, given that groups of creative professionals tend to cluster in places that provide not only the kind of jobs they seek but also the quality of life amenities they prefer. However, there remains a gap between global and local settings, in which a framework is needed to situate the cities of developing countries within this global phenomenon. Equally important is an understanding of how local knowledge and creativity in different cultural and economic contexts, particularly of cities in developing countries with their informal economy, contribute to this continuing discourse at both theoretical and practical levels. Read more or visit http://www.ar.itb.ac.id/artepolis for more details

First Monday Conference - FM10 Openness: Code, science and content - Chicago

Recent years have seen a strong interest among academics, policy makers, activists, business and other practitioners on open collaboration and access as a driver of creativity. In some areas, such as free software / open source, sustainable business models have emerged that are holding their own against more traditional, proprietary software industries. In the sciences, the notions of open science and open data demonstrate the strong tradition of openness in the academic community that, despite its past successes, is increasingly under threat. And open access journals and other open content provide inspiring examples of collaborative creativity and participatory access, such as Wikipedia, while still in search of models to ensure sustainability. There are clear links between these areas of openness: open content often looks explicitly towards open source software for business models, and open science provides through its history a glimpse of the potential of openness, how it can work, as well as a warning of the threats it may face. Finally, open collaboration is closely linked to access to knowledge issues, enabling active participation rather than passive consumption especially in developing countries. Register at http://numenor.lib.uic.edu/fmconference/ and/or send an abstract or paper to http://numenor.lib.uic.edu/fmconference/

Carnival of e-Creativity & Change-agents Conclave (India)

CeC & CaC is The Carnival of e-Creativity & Change-agents Conclave - the first in a series of public events deploying an exploratory and widely-inclusive canvas of participation & content from India and the world. The forum aims to address the Creative Empowerment of Individuals by the burgeoning spread of Technology across multiple streams of Creative Human Endeavour. visit http://www.theaea.org/cec_cac for more details

Workshop on Mobtagging - Amsterdam

Mediamatic presents a 2-day workshop on social tagging, or MOBTAGGING. Mobtagging is what happens when users freely apply and exchange labels (metadata) to online information. This non-hierarchical method of structuring information is rapidly spreading over the web, with Flickr.com, Del.icio.us and Technorati as most famous examples. It gives users the possibility to specify, index and search information on their own terms. During this workshop we will analyse the inner workings and the social effects of mobtagging. How is social tagging changing the structure of (online) information, and our relation to it? For which usergroups and what type of information is Mobtagging rewarding? What roles does Mobtagging play next to more traditional ways of indexing information? This workshop is designed for bloggers, webmasters, artists and theorists; people with a practical as well as a theoretical interest in Mobtagging. Four cutting-edge speakers (see below) introduce various concepts and practises of social tagging, and assist the participants with the (re)design and evaluation of their own Mobtagging scenario's or applications. Visit www.mediamatic.net/mobtagging for more details

VIDFEST Announces Call for Entries - Interactive Design & Digital Film

Where is digital film and interactive design heading in the new year? VIDFEST (Vancouver International Digital Festival) has launched its call for entries to its 3rd annual competition to find out. VIDFEST is developing a reputation for bringing independent and creative producers together with big name digital entertainment and media companies like EA, Nokia, ABC, Warner, and Disney. Those who make the final cut and are selected for screening or exhibition at the festival enjoy full access to all the conference sessions, events, and parties. The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2006. Entrants can submit in two areas: Digital Film : VIDFEST is looking for digitally produced shorts including: music videos, game sequences, animation, digital video; and Interactive Design : VIDFEST is looking for original, highly usable, and innovative websites in 4 categories: Business, Education, Entertainment, and Experimental/Art. More details and entry forms are available at http://www.vidfest.com

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